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Content Strategy | Writing | Editing

What's a home page supposed to DO?

Jeffrey Williams

What's wrong with this picture?

What's wrong with this picture?

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think it's supposed to make a connection that leads to a sale. 

Seems obvious. 

But I've seen this trend lately of overdesigned home pages -- as in the example above (can you guess the type of company? Answer below.)

The pages look pretty but don't ... 

  • solve my problem (or indicate an understanding of it)
  • give me a reason to care about the brand
  • tell me what to do next

Prospects are busy, and don't have time (at first, anyway) to figure out how you can help solve their problem. 

Why not make it really clear

How? 

When they visit your site, your prospect is going to be asking themselves questions like these:

  • Do you understand my problem?
  • Will you help me solve it?
  • What do you offer?
  • Who are you?
  • Can I trust you?
  • What makes you unique?
  • Am I bored?
  • What do you want me to do?

They're some pretty timeless sales questions, and if you can answer them clearly and memorably, you'll have gotten a great start toward building a lasting customer relationship.

Generally speaking, my preferred home-page structure is:

Headline/hook. Show me that you understand my problem, and that you can help me solve it.

Subheadline. Who you are and what you do.

Call to action. Often a video or an email capture. White papers are also great. They give prospects a "get to know you" option before they commit to anything. 

Social proof. Typically a logo row or testimonials. Once a prospect is engaged ("hey, they're speaking to me!") and understand that you can help them ("they offer just what I need!"), they'll want some reassurance about other people you've helped as well. That's the social proof the logos and testimonials provide.

Benefits. How you make a prospect's life better. 

Features. What you offer.

Call to action again.

Footer.

 

Answer: It's a management consulting firm.